Venus de Milo - Wikipedia

Posted by 2018  •  article

The  Aphrodite of Knidos  is famous for its beauty and often cited as an early example of art created to satisfy the male gaze . It is meant to be appreciated from every angle. It was especially shocking as it was commissioned as the  cult statue  for a temple dedicated to the goddess. It depicted the goddess Aphrodite as she prepared for the ritual bath that restored her purity (not to be confused with her virginity), discarding her drapery with one hand, while modestly shielding herself with the other. Her hands are placed in a motion that simultaneously shields her pubic area and draws attention to her upper body's exposure.

Because the various copies show different body shapes, poses and accessories, the original can only be described in general terms; the body bending in a  contrapposto position, an artistic innovation of Greek art which realistically portrays normal human stance, with the head probably turned to the left.  Lucian  said that she "wore a slight smile that just revealed her teeth", although most later copies do not preserve this. 

Praxiteles was alleged to have used the courtesan Phryne as a model for the statue, which added to the gossip surrounding its origin. The statue became so widely known and copied that in a humorous anecdote the goddess Aphrodite herself came to Knidos to see it. A lyric epigram of Antipater of Sidon [1] places a hypothetical question on the lips of the goddess herself:

The goddess Aphrodite fends off the lascivious, goat-legged god Pan with a raised sandal. He tries to pull her hand away from her covered groin. Eros, the winged god of love, flits between the pair grabbing Pan by the horns.

The  Aphrodite of Knidos  is famous for its beauty and often cited as an early example of art created to satisfy the male gaze . It is meant to be appreciated from every angle. It was especially shocking as it was commissioned as the  cult statue  for a temple dedicated to the goddess. It depicted the goddess Aphrodite as she prepared for the ritual bath that restored her purity (not to be confused with her virginity), discarding her drapery with one hand, while modestly shielding herself with the other. Her hands are placed in a motion that simultaneously shields her pubic area and draws attention to her upper body's exposure.

Because the various copies show different body shapes, poses and accessories, the original can only be described in general terms; the body bending in a  contrapposto position, an artistic innovation of Greek art which realistically portrays normal human stance, with the head probably turned to the left.  Lucian  said that she "wore a slight smile that just revealed her teeth", although most later copies do not preserve this. 

Praxiteles was alleged to have used the courtesan Phryne as a model for the statue, which added to the gossip surrounding its origin. The statue became so widely known and copied that in a humorous anecdote the goddess Aphrodite herself came to Knidos to see it. A lyric epigram of Antipater of Sidon [1] places a hypothetical question on the lips of the goddess herself:

The goddess Aphrodite fends off the lascivious, goat-legged god Pan with a raised sandal. He tries to pull her hand away from her covered groin. Eros, the winged god of love, flits between the pair grabbing Pan by the horns.

Disclaimer: This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers.

Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of UK Essays.

Parvati's style and figure in Standing Parvati is depicted differently from that of other sculptures or paintings. For example, after the Muslims took over, Parvati's bare breasts were covered and she became more modest. Also in recent artwork, she is depicted with an emphasis on her role as a mother to Ganesha and consort to Shiva. In Standing Parvati she is depicted with an emphasis on her femininity. This may take away from her depiction of a fertile figure because in this artwork she looks more gratis and more youthful.

Havelock, Christine Mitchell. The Aphrodite of Knidos and her Successors: A Historical Review of the Female Nude in Greek Art. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1995.

Hersey, George L. The Evolution of Allure: Sexual Selection from the Medici Venus to the Incredible Hulk . Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1996.

Kolosky-Ostrow, Ann Olga, and Claire L. Lyons, eds. Naked Truths: Women, Sexuality, and Gender in Classical Art and Archaeology. London; New York: Routledge, 2000.

The  Aphrodite of Knidos  is famous for its beauty and often cited as an early example of art created to satisfy the male gaze . It is meant to be appreciated from every angle. It was especially shocking as it was commissioned as the  cult statue  for a temple dedicated to the goddess. It depicted the goddess Aphrodite as she prepared for the ritual bath that restored her purity (not to be confused with her virginity), discarding her drapery with one hand, while modestly shielding herself with the other. Her hands are placed in a motion that simultaneously shields her pubic area and draws attention to her upper body's exposure.

Because the various copies show different body shapes, poses and accessories, the original can only be described in general terms; the body bending in a  contrapposto position, an artistic innovation of Greek art which realistically portrays normal human stance, with the head probably turned to the left.  Lucian  said that she "wore a slight smile that just revealed her teeth", although most later copies do not preserve this. 

Praxiteles was alleged to have used the courtesan Phryne as a model for the statue, which added to the gossip surrounding its origin. The statue became so widely known and copied that in a humorous anecdote the goddess Aphrodite herself came to Knidos to see it. A lyric epigram of Antipater of Sidon [1] places a hypothetical question on the lips of the goddess herself:

The  Aphrodite of Knidos  is famous for its beauty and often cited as an early example of art created to satisfy the male gaze . It is meant to be appreciated from every angle. It was especially shocking as it was commissioned as the  cult statue  for a temple dedicated to the goddess. It depicted the goddess Aphrodite as she prepared for the ritual bath that restored her purity (not to be confused with her virginity), discarding her drapery with one hand, while modestly shielding herself with the other. Her hands are placed in a motion that simultaneously shields her pubic area and draws attention to her upper body's exposure.

Because the various copies show different body shapes, poses and accessories, the original can only be described in general terms; the body bending in a  contrapposto position, an artistic innovation of Greek art which realistically portrays normal human stance, with the head probably turned to the left.  Lucian  said that she "wore a slight smile that just revealed her teeth", although most later copies do not preserve this. 

Praxiteles was alleged to have used the courtesan Phryne as a model for the statue, which added to the gossip surrounding its origin. The statue became so widely known and copied that in a humorous anecdote the goddess Aphrodite herself came to Knidos to see it. A lyric epigram of Antipater of Sidon [1] places a hypothetical question on the lips of the goddess herself:

The goddess Aphrodite fends off the lascivious, goat-legged god Pan with a raised sandal. He tries to pull her hand away from her covered groin. Eros, the winged god of love, flits between the pair grabbing Pan by the horns.

Disclaimer: This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers.

Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of UK Essays.

Parvati's style and figure in Standing Parvati is depicted differently from that of other sculptures or paintings. For example, after the Muslims took over, Parvati's bare breasts were covered and she became more modest. Also in recent artwork, she is depicted with an emphasis on her role as a mother to Ganesha and consort to Shiva. In Standing Parvati she is depicted with an emphasis on her femininity. This may take away from her depiction of a fertile figure because in this artwork she looks more gratis and more youthful.

The  Aphrodite of Knidos  is famous for its beauty and often cited as an early example of art created to satisfy the male gaze . It is meant to be appreciated from every angle. It was especially shocking as it was commissioned as the  cult statue  for a temple dedicated to the goddess. It depicted the goddess Aphrodite as she prepared for the ritual bath that restored her purity (not to be confused with her virginity), discarding her drapery with one hand, while modestly shielding herself with the other. Her hands are placed in a motion that simultaneously shields her pubic area and draws attention to her upper body's exposure.

Because the various copies show different body shapes, poses and accessories, the original can only be described in general terms; the body bending in a  contrapposto position, an artistic innovation of Greek art which realistically portrays normal human stance, with the head probably turned to the left.  Lucian  said that she "wore a slight smile that just revealed her teeth", although most later copies do not preserve this. 

Praxiteles was alleged to have used the courtesan Phryne as a model for the statue, which added to the gossip surrounding its origin. The statue became so widely known and copied that in a humorous anecdote the goddess Aphrodite herself came to Knidos to see it. A lyric epigram of Antipater of Sidon [1] places a hypothetical question on the lips of the goddess herself:

The goddess Aphrodite fends off the lascivious, goat-legged god Pan with a raised sandal. He tries to pull her hand away from her covered groin. Eros, the winged god of love, flits between the pair grabbing Pan by the horns.

Disclaimer: This essay has been submitted by a student. This is not an example of the work written by our professional essay writers.

Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of UK Essays.

Parvati's style and figure in Standing Parvati is depicted differently from that of other sculptures or paintings. For example, after the Muslims took over, Parvati's bare breasts were covered and she became more modest. Also in recent artwork, she is depicted with an emphasis on her role as a mother to Ganesha and consort to Shiva. In Standing Parvati she is depicted with an emphasis on her femininity. This may take away from her depiction of a fertile figure because in this artwork she looks more gratis and more youthful.

Havelock, Christine Mitchell. The Aphrodite of Knidos and her Successors: A Historical Review of the Female Nude in Greek Art. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1995.

Hersey, George L. The Evolution of Allure: Sexual Selection from the Medici Venus to the Incredible Hulk . Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1996.

Kolosky-Ostrow, Ann Olga, and Claire L. Lyons, eds. Naked Truths: Women, Sexuality, and Gender in Classical Art and Archaeology. London; New York: Routledge, 2000.

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APHRODITE IN SCULPTURE - World history

Posted by 2018  •  article

 
 

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