Aphrodite • Facts and Information on Greek Goddess Aphrodite

Posted by 2018  •  article

Aphrodite (Venus) Greek Goddess - Art Picture by KamillYonsiya Aphrodite (Venus) Greek Goddess - Art Picture by KamillYonsiya

Aphrodite (Venus) and Ares (Mars) - Art Picture by hellstern Aphrodite (Venus) and Ares (Mars) - Art Picture by hellstern

Aphrodite (Venus) Greek Goddess - Art Picture by zeoxisace71 Aphrodite (Venus) Greek Goddess - Art Picture by zeoxisace71

Aphrodite was a diverse deity and she served multiple purposes in the lives of the Greeks in antiquity. The gross numbers of sanctuaries and cults dedicated to her showed her popularity. Different sanctuaries with cults associated to them demonstrates that Aphrodite definitely played a role in various aspects of life, especially where in Athens she had five shrines dedicated to her between just the Acropolis and the Agora. Her importance to Greek people was really shown when some of the population was travelling to and settling in Miletus. Cults were established there and it proved that the people wanted Aphrodite present in their lives when they were making a new place home.

Anagnostou-Laoutides, E., & Konstan, D. (2008). Daphnis and Aphrodite: A Love Affrair in Theocritus Idyll 1. American Journal of Philology, 129 (4), 521. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.libproxy.mta.ca/docview/223128356?accountid=12599

Bell, S. (1998). Aphrodite of the marketplace: Fetishism, value, and sexual] pragmatism. Rethinking Marxism, 10 (4), 134, 135, 136. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.libproxy.mta.ca/docview/212142497?accountid=12599

Aphrodite (Venus) Greek Goddess - Art Picture by KamillYonsiya Aphrodite (Venus) Greek Goddess - Art Picture by KamillYonsiya

Aphrodite (Venus) and Ares (Mars) - Art Picture by hellstern Aphrodite (Venus) and Ares (Mars) - Art Picture by hellstern

Aphrodite (Venus) Greek Goddess - Art Picture by zeoxisace71 Aphrodite (Venus) Greek Goddess - Art Picture by zeoxisace71

Aphrodite was a diverse deity and she served multiple purposes in the lives of the Greeks in antiquity. The gross numbers of sanctuaries and cults dedicated to her showed her popularity. Different sanctuaries with cults associated to them demonstrates that Aphrodite definitely played a role in various aspects of life, especially where in Athens she had five shrines dedicated to her between just the Acropolis and the Agora. Her importance to Greek people was really shown when some of the population was travelling to and settling in Miletus. Cults were established there and it proved that the people wanted Aphrodite present in their lives when they were making a new place home.

Anagnostou-Laoutides, E., & Konstan, D. (2008). Daphnis and Aphrodite: A Love Affrair in Theocritus Idyll 1. American Journal of Philology, 129 (4), 521. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.libproxy.mta.ca/docview/223128356?accountid=12599

Bell, S. (1998). Aphrodite of the marketplace: Fetishism, value, and sexual] pragmatism. Rethinking Marxism, 10 (4), 134, 135, 136. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.libproxy.mta.ca/docview/212142497?accountid=12599

Aphrodite is in a class of her own, as she had a magical quality, and the ability to transform people. Aphrodite is the alchemical goddess, because she alone had magical powers of transformation that could cause both gods and mortals to do as she bid them. She cast spells which resulted in mortals and deities falling in love, and conceiving new life. She turned a statue into a living woman for Pygmalion. She inspired poetry and declarations of love, symbolizing her creativity in using the power of love.

She has traits in common with other goddesses of greek mythology, but does not belong in any group, thus stands alone. Aphrodite was the most sexually active goddess, so she cannot be grouped with the virgin goddesses, Artemis, Athena or Hestia. The only way she is like them is that she does what she wants, when she wants, and lives to satisfy her own pleasures.

Aphrodite also does not fit the profile of a vulnerable goddess, such as Hera, Demeter, or Persephone, as she was never victimized by a man or made to suffer because of one. The feelings and desires were mutual in any relationship Aphrodite entered into, and she valued independence from others (which was not a trait of the virgin goddesses), and she was not looking to get into a permanent situation with any one man (a characteristic of the vulnerable goddesses).

Aphrodite was the Greek goddess of love and beauty, and is honored by many Pagans today. Her equivalent in Roman mythology is the goddess Venus . She is sometimes referred to as  Lady of  Cytherea or Lady of Cyrpus , because of her cult locations and place of origin.  

At one point, Aphrodite had a fling with Adonis , the young hunter god. He was killed by a wild boar one day, and some tales indicate that the boar might have been a jealous Ares in disguise.

In many myths and legends, Aphrodite is portrayed as self-absorbed and cranky. It would seem that like many of the other Greek gods, she spent a lot of time meddling in the affairs of mortals, mostly for her own amusement. She was instrumental in the cause of the Trojan War; Aphrodite offered Helen of Sparta to Paris, the prince of Troy, and then when he saw Helen for the first time, Aphrodite made sure he was inflamed with lust, thus leading to Helen's abduction and a decade of war.

Aphrodite (Venus) Greek Goddess - Art Picture by KamillYonsiya Aphrodite (Venus) Greek Goddess - Art Picture by KamillYonsiya

Aphrodite (Venus) and Ares (Mars) - Art Picture by hellstern Aphrodite (Venus) and Ares (Mars) - Art Picture by hellstern

Aphrodite (Venus) Greek Goddess - Art Picture by zeoxisace71 Aphrodite (Venus) Greek Goddess - Art Picture by zeoxisace71

Aphrodite was a diverse deity and she served multiple purposes in the lives of the Greeks in antiquity. The gross numbers of sanctuaries and cults dedicated to her showed her popularity. Different sanctuaries with cults associated to them demonstrates that Aphrodite definitely played a role in various aspects of life, especially where in Athens she had five shrines dedicated to her between just the Acropolis and the Agora. Her importance to Greek people was really shown when some of the population was travelling to and settling in Miletus. Cults were established there and it proved that the people wanted Aphrodite present in their lives when they were making a new place home.

Anagnostou-Laoutides, E., & Konstan, D. (2008). Daphnis and Aphrodite: A Love Affrair in Theocritus Idyll 1. American Journal of Philology, 129 (4), 521. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.libproxy.mta.ca/docview/223128356?accountid=12599

Bell, S. (1998). Aphrodite of the marketplace: Fetishism, value, and sexual] pragmatism. Rethinking Marxism, 10 (4), 134, 135, 136. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.libproxy.mta.ca/docview/212142497?accountid=12599

Aphrodite is in a class of her own, as she had a magical quality, and the ability to transform people. Aphrodite is the alchemical goddess, because she alone had magical powers of transformation that could cause both gods and mortals to do as she bid them. She cast spells which resulted in mortals and deities falling in love, and conceiving new life. She turned a statue into a living woman for Pygmalion. She inspired poetry and declarations of love, symbolizing her creativity in using the power of love.

She has traits in common with other goddesses of greek mythology, but does not belong in any group, thus stands alone. Aphrodite was the most sexually active goddess, so she cannot be grouped with the virgin goddesses, Artemis, Athena or Hestia. The only way she is like them is that she does what she wants, when she wants, and lives to satisfy her own pleasures.

Aphrodite also does not fit the profile of a vulnerable goddess, such as Hera, Demeter, or Persephone, as she was never victimized by a man or made to suffer because of one. The feelings and desires were mutual in any relationship Aphrodite entered into, and she valued independence from others (which was not a trait of the virgin goddesses), and she was not looking to get into a permanent situation with any one man (a characteristic of the vulnerable goddesses).

Aphrodite (Venus) Greek Goddess - Art Picture by KamillYonsiya Aphrodite (Venus) Greek Goddess - Art Picture by KamillYonsiya

Aphrodite (Venus) and Ares (Mars) - Art Picture by hellstern Aphrodite (Venus) and Ares (Mars) - Art Picture by hellstern

Aphrodite (Venus) Greek Goddess - Art Picture by zeoxisace71 Aphrodite (Venus) Greek Goddess - Art Picture by zeoxisace71


APHRODITE - Greek Goddess of Love & Beauty (Roman Venus)

Posted by 2018  •  article

 
 

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