Gay American History: Lesbians and Gay Men in the U.S.A.

Posted by 2018  •  article

Professor Nancy Unger talked about the role of gay bars in American history. Professor Unger said that by the end of the 19th century, bars… read more

Role of Gay Bars in American History Professor Nancy Unger talked about the role of gay bars in American history. Professor Unger said that by the end of the 19th century, bars and clubs catering to homosexuals could be found in most major American cities. She argued that these establishments offered gays and lesbians not only a place to socialize, but served as venues for creating movements to push for more social and legal acceptance. close

Jonathan Rieder talked about his book, Gospel of Freedom: Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Letter From Birmingham Jail and the Struggle That Changed A…

Eskridge, William N. Jr., "A History of Same Sex Marriage" (1993). Faculty Scholarship Series . 1504.
http://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/fss_papers/1504

Home | About | FAQ | My Account | Accessibility Statement | Contact Us | Search Morris | Search Orbis

LGBT history dates back to the first recorded instances of same-sex love and sexuality of ancient civilizations , involving the history of lesbian , gay , bisexual , transsexual , and transgender ( LGBT ) peoples and cultures around the world. What survives after many centuries of persecution—resulting in shame, suppression, and secrecy—has only in more recent decades been pursued and interwoven into more mainstream historical narratives.

In 1994 the annual observance of LGBT History Month began in the US, and it has since been picked up in other countries. This observance involves highlighting the history of the people, LGBT rights and related civil rights movements. It is observed during October in the United States, to include National Coming Out Day on October 11. [4] In the United Kingdom, it is observed during February, to coincide with a major celebration of the 2005 abolition of Section 28 , which had prohibited schools from discussing LGBT issues or counseling LGBT or questioning youth. [5] [6]

Among historical figures, some were recorded as having relations with others of their own sex — exclusively or together with opposite-sex relations — while others were recorded as only having relations with the opposite sex. However, there are instances of same-sex love and sexuality within almost all ancient civilizations. Additionally, people who are third gender or what we would now think of as transgender have been recorded in almost all cultures across human history.

Professor Nancy Unger talked about the role of gay bars in American history. Professor Unger said that by the end of the 19th century, bars… read more

Role of Gay Bars in American History Professor Nancy Unger talked about the role of gay bars in American history. Professor Unger said that by the end of the 19th century, bars and clubs catering to homosexuals could be found in most major American cities. She argued that these establishments offered gays and lesbians not only a place to socialize, but served as venues for creating movements to push for more social and legal acceptance. close

Jonathan Rieder talked about his book, Gospel of Freedom: Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Letter From Birmingham Jail and the Struggle That Changed A…

Eskridge, William N. Jr., "A History of Same Sex Marriage" (1993). Faculty Scholarship Series . 1504.
http://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/fss_papers/1504

Home | About | FAQ | My Account | Accessibility Statement | Contact Us | Search Morris | Search Orbis

LGBT history dates back to the first recorded instances of same-sex love and sexuality of ancient civilizations , involving the history of lesbian , gay , bisexual , transsexual , and transgender ( LGBT ) peoples and cultures around the world. What survives after many centuries of persecution—resulting in shame, suppression, and secrecy—has only in more recent decades been pursued and interwoven into more mainstream historical narratives.

In 1994 the annual observance of LGBT History Month began in the US, and it has since been picked up in other countries. This observance involves highlighting the history of the people, LGBT rights and related civil rights movements. It is observed during October in the United States, to include National Coming Out Day on October 11. [4] In the United Kingdom, it is observed during February, to coincide with a major celebration of the 2005 abolition of Section 28 , which had prohibited schools from discussing LGBT issues or counseling LGBT or questioning youth. [5] [6]

Among historical figures, some were recorded as having relations with others of their own sex — exclusively or together with opposite-sex relations — while others were recorded as only having relations with the opposite sex. However, there are instances of same-sex love and sexuality within almost all ancient civilizations. Additionally, people who are third gender or what we would now think of as transgender have been recorded in almost all cultures across human history.

OutHistory.org tells stories about people in the past who identified as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender; and people who did not conform to dominant norms of sexuality and gender. OutHistory.org uncovers histories of same-gender love and of gender crossing in the recent and distant past, and it tells stories about how people came to experience themselves as heterosexual, homosexual or bisexual through the historical construction of the heterosexual/homosexual binary.

We believe that history is an especially valuable resource for LGBT people and our allies, since most of us did not grow up in families or communities where this history was easily available and taught.

We believe that knowing  this history can inspire and excite people, can rouse us to action, and can help us make a different future.

Rachel Hope Cleves  is professor of history at the University of Victoria in British Columbia. She specializes in early American history and has written about the history of same-sex marriage and about American reactions to the French Revolution. Her most recent book is  Charity and Sylvia: A Same-Sex Marriage in Early America (Oxford University Press, 2014). She is presently at work on a book project titled “Good Food, Bad Sex.” You can follow her on twitter @RachelCleves .

I’m curious why you refer to Jim Fouratt’s remarks as “trolling?” The link you provided to the Fouratt interview with Sarah Schulman shows Jim’s long, long history in Gay Liberation. He is an honorable forefather of the Gay Movement, and, in my opinion, should be treated with at least some dignity. You might not have agreed with his remarks – which you did not quote – but to call them “trolling” seems, to me, to be unfair without some kind of explanation.

Thank you for this reflection, which helps me understand some of the concerns of my lesbian partners on the journey. Though I am a college professor, my initial response feels more pastoral than academic.

On September 3, 2015, Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis was thrown in jail on a contempt of court charge for refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples at the Rowan County Courthouse in Morehead, Kentucky. She claims the Supreme Court ruling conflicts with her Christian faith.

Five days later, U.S. District Judge David Bunning lifted the contempt order against Davis, saying he was satisfied that her deputies are fulfilling their obligation to grant licenses in her absence. Bunning warned, however, that there will be trouble if Davis tries to interfere with the issuance of those licenses in any way.

Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis is set to be released September 8, 2015, just before she was to receive jailhouse visits from presidential candidates Mike Huckabee and Ted Cruz.

Professor Nancy Unger talked about the role of gay bars in American history. Professor Unger said that by the end of the 19th century, bars… read more

Role of Gay Bars in American History Professor Nancy Unger talked about the role of gay bars in American history. Professor Unger said that by the end of the 19th century, bars and clubs catering to homosexuals could be found in most major American cities. She argued that these establishments offered gays and lesbians not only a place to socialize, but served as venues for creating movements to push for more social and legal acceptance. close

Jonathan Rieder talked about his book, Gospel of Freedom: Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Letter From Birmingham Jail and the Struggle That Changed A…

Eskridge, William N. Jr., "A History of Same Sex Marriage" (1993). Faculty Scholarship Series . 1504.
http://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/fss_papers/1504

Home | About | FAQ | My Account | Accessibility Statement | Contact Us | Search Morris | Search Orbis

Professor Nancy Unger talked about the role of gay bars in American history. Professor Unger said that by the end of the 19th century, bars… read more

Role of Gay Bars in American History Professor Nancy Unger talked about the role of gay bars in American history. Professor Unger said that by the end of the 19th century, bars and clubs catering to homosexuals could be found in most major American cities. She argued that these establishments offered gays and lesbians not only a place to socialize, but served as venues for creating movements to push for more social and legal acceptance. close

Jonathan Rieder talked about his book, Gospel of Freedom: Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Letter From Birmingham Jail and the Struggle That Changed A…

Professor Nancy Unger talked about the role of gay bars in American history. Professor Unger said that by the end of the 19th century, bars… read more

Role of Gay Bars in American History Professor Nancy Unger talked about the role of gay bars in American history. Professor Unger said that by the end of the 19th century, bars and clubs catering to homosexuals could be found in most major American cities. She argued that these establishments offered gays and lesbians not only a place to socialize, but served as venues for creating movements to push for more social and legal acceptance. close

Jonathan Rieder talked about his book, Gospel of Freedom: Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Letter From Birmingham Jail and the Struggle That Changed A…

Eskridge, William N. Jr., "A History of Same Sex Marriage" (1993). Faculty Scholarship Series . 1504.
http://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/fss_papers/1504

Home | About | FAQ | My Account | Accessibility Statement | Contact Us | Search Morris | Search Orbis

LGBT history dates back to the first recorded instances of same-sex love and sexuality of ancient civilizations , involving the history of lesbian , gay , bisexual , transsexual , and transgender ( LGBT ) peoples and cultures around the world. What survives after many centuries of persecution—resulting in shame, suppression, and secrecy—has only in more recent decades been pursued and interwoven into more mainstream historical narratives.

In 1994 the annual observance of LGBT History Month began in the US, and it has since been picked up in other countries. This observance involves highlighting the history of the people, LGBT rights and related civil rights movements. It is observed during October in the United States, to include National Coming Out Day on October 11. [4] In the United Kingdom, it is observed during February, to coincide with a major celebration of the 2005 abolition of Section 28 , which had prohibited schools from discussing LGBT issues or counseling LGBT or questioning youth. [5] [6]

Among historical figures, some were recorded as having relations with others of their own sex — exclusively or together with opposite-sex relations — while others were recorded as only having relations with the opposite sex. However, there are instances of same-sex love and sexuality within almost all ancient civilizations. Additionally, people who are third gender or what we would now think of as transgender have been recorded in almost all cultures across human history.

OutHistory.org tells stories about people in the past who identified as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender; and people who did not conform to dominant norms of sexuality and gender. OutHistory.org uncovers histories of same-gender love and of gender crossing in the recent and distant past, and it tells stories about how people came to experience themselves as heterosexual, homosexual or bisexual through the historical construction of the heterosexual/homosexual binary.

We believe that history is an especially valuable resource for LGBT people and our allies, since most of us did not grow up in families or communities where this history was easily available and taught.

We believe that knowing  this history can inspire and excite people, can rouse us to action, and can help us make a different future.

Professor Nancy Unger talked about the role of gay bars in American history. Professor Unger said that by the end of the 19th century, bars… read more

Role of Gay Bars in American History Professor Nancy Unger talked about the role of gay bars in American history. Professor Unger said that by the end of the 19th century, bars and clubs catering to homosexuals could be found in most major American cities. She argued that these establishments offered gays and lesbians not only a place to socialize, but served as venues for creating movements to push for more social and legal acceptance. close

Jonathan Rieder talked about his book, Gospel of Freedom: Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Letter From Birmingham Jail and the Struggle That Changed A…

Eskridge, William N. Jr., "A History of Same Sex Marriage" (1993). Faculty Scholarship Series . 1504.
http://digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/fss_papers/1504

Home | About | FAQ | My Account | Accessibility Statement | Contact Us | Search Morris | Search Orbis

LGBT history dates back to the first recorded instances of same-sex love and sexuality of ancient civilizations , involving the history of lesbian , gay , bisexual , transsexual , and transgender ( LGBT ) peoples and cultures around the world. What survives after many centuries of persecution—resulting in shame, suppression, and secrecy—has only in more recent decades been pursued and interwoven into more mainstream historical narratives.

In 1994 the annual observance of LGBT History Month began in the US, and it has since been picked up in other countries. This observance involves highlighting the history of the people, LGBT rights and related civil rights movements. It is observed during October in the United States, to include National Coming Out Day on October 11. [4] In the United Kingdom, it is observed during February, to coincide with a major celebration of the 2005 abolition of Section 28 , which had prohibited schools from discussing LGBT issues or counseling LGBT or questioning youth. [5] [6]

Among historical figures, some were recorded as having relations with others of their own sex — exclusively or together with opposite-sex relations — while others were recorded as only having relations with the opposite sex. However, there are instances of same-sex love and sexuality within almost all ancient civilizations. Additionally, people who are third gender or what we would now think of as transgender have been recorded in almost all cultures across human history.

OutHistory.org tells stories about people in the past who identified as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender; and people who did not conform to dominant norms of sexuality and gender. OutHistory.org uncovers histories of same-gender love and of gender crossing in the recent and distant past, and it tells stories about how people came to experience themselves as heterosexual, homosexual or bisexual through the historical construction of the heterosexual/homosexual binary.

We believe that history is an especially valuable resource for LGBT people and our allies, since most of us did not grow up in families or communities where this history was easily available and taught.

We believe that knowing  this history can inspire and excite people, can rouse us to action, and can help us make a different future.

Rachel Hope Cleves  is professor of history at the University of Victoria in British Columbia. She specializes in early American history and has written about the history of same-sex marriage and about American reactions to the French Revolution. Her most recent book is  Charity and Sylvia: A Same-Sex Marriage in Early America (Oxford University Press, 2014). She is presently at work on a book project titled “Good Food, Bad Sex.” You can follow her on twitter @RachelCleves .

I’m curious why you refer to Jim Fouratt’s remarks as “trolling?” The link you provided to the Fouratt interview with Sarah Schulman shows Jim’s long, long history in Gay Liberation. He is an honorable forefather of the Gay Movement, and, in my opinion, should be treated with at least some dignity. You might not have agreed with his remarks – which you did not quote – but to call them “trolling” seems, to me, to be unfair without some kind of explanation.

Thank you for this reflection, which helps me understand some of the concerns of my lesbian partners on the journey. Though I am a college professor, my initial response feels more pastoral than academic.


Gay American History: Secrets Of The United States Queer.

Posted by 2018  •  article

 
 

41BpCa5qBxL